Raco Life Blog 110614 Desk 9

Building Rache’s Desk

As you know, our way is the middle way. 50% work 50% fun in this case. When we work, we always try to engage in projects that are productive and fruitful, but also a lot of fun and challenging. If it’s too hard and too much work for something we don’t really want, we don’t do it. Likewise, if it’s too easy and doesn’t bring us a challenge or a new interesting result, we don’t do it either. The construction of this desk is a great example of the RACO 50/50 philosophy.

For some reason we have been at this house for a month plus and Rache still doesn’t have a desk. That should have been priority number one. But sometimes we do things backwards. So finally she was like “All I want is a desk and internet and I’ll be happy, make it happen!” Loud and clear Rache.

And I love to build things so it was no issue for me to get rolling with that. And even better we had a ton of old wood laying around from the old casita roof and other things.  The best pieces were 2″ thick and 12″ wide and heavily weathered, perfect.

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Scrap wood from other projects, perfect for the desk.

 

Here are some the of pieces we cut, laid out on the bench and ready to assemble:

Cut pieces, ready to assemble.

Cut pieces, ready to assemble…beautiful wood!

 

We designed it to have a surface of 62″ wide x 36″ deep. Because Rache wanted the 2″ thick chunky pieces of wood, we decided the depth of the desk should be 36″ to really give it the mass it needed. It worked nicely as you will see in the finished photos. It was cut 62″ so it would fit in the nook in our bedroom that overlooks the lake.

Here are some drawings of the design:

Plan and elevation drawings of the desk.

Plan and elevation drawings of the desk.

 

Making some initial measurements:

Measuring for the cuts.

Measuring for the cuts.

 

Here are most of the pieces cut and ready to assemble:

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Now we assembled the pieces. Just used lots of screws, no bolts. Maybe down the line if we want to move it I will replace screws with bolts for easy disassembly.

Assembled desk frame.

Assembled desk frame.


Assembled desk frame. Lake in the background. Not a bad workshop!

Assembled desk frame. Lake in the background. Not a bad workshop!

 

I love the fact that the wood is so old and weathered because it gave me freedom to leave the cuts loose and rough and added to the overall rustic feel of the desk.

After adding the shelves, Rache wanted the bottom part of the desk painted, so Efrain set to work on that.

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Detail

Detail

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After it was painted we decided to weather it by sanding a little. Then we added some of the oil that they use on the wood details of the house. This really added a nice patina to the finished piece.

Finished!

Finished!

 

Moving the desk into the space. This thing is a tank! If there is a big earthquake, likely the only left standing will be this desk.

 

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Desk in place, Rache is ecstatic. This is what it’s all about!

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*Added bonus, Claudia is describing the construction in Spanish.